Working with practitioners & professionals.

Working with practitioners.

Peer & Clinical Supervision

Supportive & Reflective

Supervision

Supervision

Professional supervision is a supportive and enabling process where a supervisor and supervisee reflect on work practice together. Reed provides supervisory support to practitioners across different modalities. His approach is strongly influenced by research in neuroscience and is underpinned by person-centred principles and compassion.

The supervision relationship offers supervisees the reflective time, a safe space, and a formal structure to notice, wonder, and realise fresh perspectives on current practice and professional identity. This process counters burnout and compassion fatigue and fosters resilience as you continue in your work.

Mentorships

Mentorships

Reed’s theraputic approach is applied to his mentorships for early-career practitioners – a durational and relational model where the clinical supervision is steeped in the same inter/intrapersonal elements: positive regard, reflective inquiry and reflexive action, congruence, empathic understanding, and compassion.

These relational elements create a safe space and engender self-inquiry and co-regulation.

This model of clinical supervision involves both supervisor and supervisee committing to a more intensive model of mentorship which prioritises developing the person as well as the clinician and making more space to seek, inquire, listen, challenge, and belong. Mentorships are twelve months in duration and limited to two (2) supervisees in any given year.

Reed appreciates the transformative capacity of relational therapy and clients develop and flourish when the work is underpinned by the core conditions of positive regard, congruence, and empathic understanding.

Peer & Clinical Supervision

Professional supervision is a supportive and enabling process where a supervisor and supervisee reflect on work practice together. Reed provides supervisory support to practitioners across different modalities. His approach is strongly influenced by research in neuroscience and is underpinned by person-centred principles and compassion.

The supervision relationship offers supervisees the reflective time, a safe space, and a formal structure to notice, wonder, and realise fresh perspectives on current practice and professional identity. This process counters burnout and compassion fatigue and fosters resilience as you continue in your work.

Mentorships

Reed’s theraputic approach is applied to his mentorships for early-career practitioners – a durational and relational model where the clinical supervision is steeped in the same inter/intrapersonal elements: positive regard, reflective inquiry and reflexive action, congruence, empathic understanding, and compassion.

These relational elements create a safe space and engender self-inquiry and co-regulation.

This model of clinical supervision involves both supervisor and supervisee committing to a more intensive model of mentorship which prioritises developing the person as well as the clinician and making more space to seek, inquire, listen, challenge, and belong. Mentorships are twelve months in duration and limited to two (2) supervisees in any given year.

Reed appreciates the transformative capacity of relational therapy and clients develop and flourish when the work is underpinned by the core conditions of positive regard, congruence, and empathic understanding.